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Pupil Premium

Number of Pupil Premium Grant (PPG) received

 

  2019-2020 2020-2021
Total number of pupils on role 241 236

Total number of pupils eligible for PPG

for whom funding received

52 54
Number of pupils eligible for PP+ funding 8 7
Amount of PPG / PP+ funding per pupil £1320 / £2345 £1320 / £2345
Total Funding received £87,570  

*NB: PPG funding is calculated using the January Census rather than linking to the school year.

What is Pupil Premium?

 

The Pupil Premium is an allocation of funding, direct from the Government, which is given to schools based on the number of pupils entitled to free school meals. The funding is allocated by identifying any pupils who have been in receipt of free school meals in the last 6 years. For Looked After Children, the Pupil Premium was calculated using the Children Looked After data returns.  Previously Looked After Pupils receive slightly more funding and are categorised as Pupil Premium Plus (PP+).   A premium is also allocated for children whose parents are serving in the armed forces.  This service premium is designed to address the emotional and social well-being of these pupils.

 

Nationally there is considerable evidence to show that pupils and young people in receipt of Free School Meals do less well than their peers. Whilst this is not always the case, the purpose of the funding is to support the school in ensuring this group of pupils achieve as much as they can. The most important achievements being in English and mathematics, which are so vital for moving onto secondary school and for future employment. The impact of Pupil Premium funding is monitored regularly by leaders and the impact of the strategy reported termly to Governors.  The impact of this funding is shared annually.

What are the principles about how the funding is used at Bitterne Manor Primary?

 

  • We ensure that our teaching and learning opportunities meet the needs of all pupils.
  • We ensure that appropriate provision is made to meet the needs of pupils who belong to vulnerable groups, which includes those from a socially or economically disadvantaged backgrounds.
  • In making provision for socially disadvantaged pupils, we recognise that not every child in receipt of free school meals will be socially disadvantaged.
  • We will ensure that the funding is used appropriately to meet the needs of any pupils at risk of underachievement, who are in receipt of free school meals. We also reserve the right to allocate Pupil Premium funding to support any pupil or groups of pupils the school has legitimately identified as being socially disadvantaged.
  • Pupil Premium will be allocated following a needs analysis which will identify priority classes, groups or individuals. Limited funding and resources means that not all pupils receiving Free School Meals will be in receipt of Pupil Premium interventions at one time.

Pupil Premium Strategy

 

The Pupil Premium and Pupil Premium Plus Grant will be used to provide additional educational support to improve the progress; raise the standard of achievement and narrow the gap between the achievement of these pupils and their peers.  We will ensure that it reaches those pupils who need it most and that it makes a significant impact on their education and lives.

 

The following barriers have been identified for those children at risk of under achievement. Whilst this is not exclusive to the Pupil Premium, the barriers are more highly represented within the group:

  • Low levels of communication and language (evidence Attainment on Entry information, Salford Reading test analysis, end of year assessment reviews, book scrutiny and Special Educational Needs and Disabilities information). This barrier impacts on inference in reading, vocabulary choices and quality of writing and the ability to reason and communicate in maths
  • Home learning support, particularly for those children with higher levels of need (SEN/emotional) so that basic skills become automatic
  • Lower levels of resilience and resourcefulness, in some cases lower self-belief.
  • A small number of pupils have multiple complex barriers to learning including SEND. Whilst this is addressed mainly through the SEND budget, additional resources are needed to ensure pupils can access class learning. This is particularly around learning behaviour, anger management and emotional literacy.
  • Lack of wider experiences beyond the school, often costly (e.g. music, sport and visits) which reduces the opportunities children have to practice, apply and enrich their learning.

 

The prime strategy for addressing any barriers is ‘quality first teaching’ and all staff are committed to ensuring this happens for every individual. The school uses research based evidence to ensure interventions are appropriate and enrich high quality teaching. Senior Leaders and Governors monitor closely the impact of any intervention to ensure funding is targeted appropriately. The proportion of children in receipt of Pupil Premium funding has reduced over the past few years with funding levels dropping from £?? to £?? which has impacted on what can be offered.

 

The school looks closely at published research (including the work of the ‘Education Endowment Foundation’) to ensure strategies are effective. The interventions identified below are predominantly for those in receipt of Pupil Premium Grant (PPG) however will include any child deemed as disadvantaged or in need. Where those pupils are not in receipt of Pupil Premium Grant funding, the whole school budget puts in appropriate funding. As in previous years, the majority of the budget is spent on staffing. In order to measure impact, the school holds detailed records of which interventions have been accessed by which children and uses this information to identify where children were at the start of the intervention and where they are at the end. A range of indicators are used  including attainment and progress, behaviour records, pre and post assessments as well as feedback from pupils and parents.

Accountability

 

The Headteacher and Leadership Team will regularly and rigorously monitor, evaluate and review the strategies we have put in place for the Pupil Premium and Pupil Premium Grant.  The PP Link Governor meets with the Senior Leadership Team each half term to provide support and challenge.  The outcome of these meetings - progress and impact is reported to the full Governing Body.

 

How Was The Pupil Premium Grant Spent in 2019-2020

 

In 2019/20 the following strategies were used to address the barriers identified above:

  • Talk About InterventionTalkabout is a highly regarded 3 term intervention that focuses on developing self-awareness and self-esteem, using a practical resource.  Self-awareness and self-esteem is an essential prerequisite to developing social skills.  This intervention was run by the 2 school ELSAs and a Teaching Assistant (with prior experience of using the programme).  There is a pre and post screening assessment and the expectation is that children will develop in these areas so that it positively impacts on their social skills and overall mental wellbeing, both in and out of school.
  • ELSA Support:  Bitterne Manor Primary school has had considerable success in delivering Nurture approach interventions as part of the strategy to narrow the gap. The programmes have been run on research based effective strategies that have been shown to raise self-esteem, increase resilience, support self-regulation and improve attitudes to learning. The Boxall Profiling tool is used to measure impact. The ELSAs also support pupils from across the school with a wide range of emotional literacy support packages to address individual issues and improve attitudes to learning including research based interventions to address areas such as anger management, managing feelings and supporting communication.
  • Meet and Greet:   This is part of the emotional literacy curriculum to support children in having a positive start to the day. It helps them make the bridge between home and school and develop resilience in making this transition.  The vast majority of those targeted are eligible for PPG. This has also helped increase attendance.
  • Lunchtime Support:  To support children who struggle at lunchtime with socialising and eating issues. This also supports the pupils to have a positive start to the afternoon with improved attitudes to learning and increased self-regulation. Language skills are also targeted. The vast majority are entitled to PPG.  Clubs include gardening club; computing and art based activities.
  • Active Parental Engagement:  Evidence shows that this can be a bigger indicator of success than a family’s economic situation.   The school have therefore hosted a Being a Parent (BAP) course with the support of Sure Start.  Our ELSA was trained in running the course, alongside one of our PPG parents, so that this could be offered to other families at times that supported those requiring it.   In addition to this, our ELSAs offered weekly coffee morning sessions for parents, which provided support as required.  The Leadership Team also actively supported parents where attendance was an issue.
  • Booster/Intervention sessions to narrow gaps:  This includes:
    • Year 6 Daily Booster Sessions:  There are two qualified teachers in Year 6 every morning to reduce the pupil:adult ratio.  This ensures pupils gaps can be more easily identified and addressed, resulting in accelerated progress.
    • Year 1 Daily Phonics Booster Sessions:  Additional adults, trained in phonics, support the delivery of phonics daily.  This ensures pupils are in smaller, targeted groups when learning and securing the sounds.  It also means there is a greater emphasis on blending and the application of phonics.
    • Year 2 Daily Phonics Sessions:  Additional adults, trained in phonics, support those pupils who did not secure phonics in Year 1 to ensure they are able to narrow the gap in Year 2.
    • Additional TA time in Year R, 1 and 2 to support early intervention, basic skills, language enrichment, phonics and reading.
    • Additional TA time in Years 3, 4, 5 and 6 to support additional targeted reading and communication interventions
    • Deputy Head and Maths Leader before school Maths Booster sessions in Year 6 for 30 mins, once per week.  
    • Additional TA Support for Behavioural Needs.  A number of children entitled to PPG have very high levels of emotional need which results in challenging behaviour. In order to successfully integrate them into class based learning they require additional support above that provided by the class teacher and not funded/totally funded by the SEND budget. We have additional highly trained TA’s in the school who work flexibly and successfully support individuals when needed.
    • We also used additional TA time to provide additional 1-1/small group support time for those children who need extra practice and reinforcement, particularly in reading.
    • Fischer Family Trust (FFT) wave 3 intervention is used to support pupils who do not reach a Good Level of Development at the end of Year R are identified for FFT.  This is an intensive 1:1 intervention designed to narrow the gap in pupils who struggle with reading and writing.  Evidence has shown that pupils make accelerated progress in their reading age and phonics knowledge.
    • EAL support with a specialist Bilingual Assistant.
    • Occupational Therapy programmes to improve pupils’ fine and gross motor skills, as advised by the OT or using exercises from the Solent NHS Therapy Pack.
  • Book Buddies:  Pupils eligible for PPG are included in the Book Buddy system in school.  This involves an older pupil supporting a younger pupil with their reading at lunchtime twice per week.
  • Homework Support: Providing opportunities for pupils to complete their Home Learning in school with the support of the child’s teacher, TA or member of SLT.
  • Acquiring effective materials for pupils entitled to PP / PP+ funding:  These aim to raise standards particularly in reading and maths.  Pupils are given opportunities to log onto Bug Club (reading) or Times Tables Rockstars (maths) during lunchtimes.  We have also developed a PP Library where children can borrow additional books.
  • Agency Support: Pupils who are eligible for the PPG are prioritised for external agency support including support from: Educational Psychologists; Bi-lingual Assistants; SAOS (Southampton Advisory Outreach Service) and COMPASS.
  • Enrichment Activities: Children with a wider experience base are often more able to apply their learning in different contexts, have a wide vocabulary and are able to use their imagination. All these different skills have a significant impact on children’s progress and lifting the barriers identified above. As a result of this the school funds/subsidises a number of enrichment activities targeted at those eligible for PPG. These include:
    • Leasing of the mini bus for regular trips including music events
    • Instrumental Lessons
    • Subsidies/funding for class curriculum trips
    • After School sports clubs targeted at children eligible for PPG but not solely (see Sports Premium Funding Report)
  • ​​​​​​​Uniform Entitlement:  Pupils eligible for the PPG are given a uniform allowance of £30 per academic year to purchase school uniform. Enabling all pupils to wear the same uniform ensures they look smart, gives the school an identity and gives every child a sense of belonging.
  • School Milk:  All pupils in receipt of the PPG are able to have milk in school each day and will be offered a snack if they have not had breakfast to ensure they are able to concentrate on their learning.
  • Covid Response:  All pupils eligible for PPG were contacted regularly and home visits were made for those that could not be contacted via the telephone.  2 PP pupils attended school regularly, despite not meeting the EHCP/vulnerable criteria, as they were considered vulnerable by the school and parents were struggling to manage at home.  IT equipment was loaned to 2 families who did not have access to it during the lockdown period and others were provided with packs of work and resources.

What was the Impact?

 

Strategy

Impact

Talk About

Progress on pupils’ IEP / IBPs indicates that the pupils involved in the Talk About intervention (25% of PP pupils) improved their ability to regulate their emotions.  There is a reduction in the number of school exclusions since the programme was introduced in September 2019.

ELSA support

22 pupils of the 56 (39%) in the PP Group received ELSA support in some form prior to lockdown. This enabled a variety of social and emotional issues to be overcome, allowing pupils to be more successful in accessing the curriculum. Lost learning time significantly decreased and pupils were demonstrating the skills required to overcome issues far more frequently and show resilience.  The number of exclusions also reduced.

Active Parental Engagement – This strategy is being built Through a range of strategies including: Becoming A Parent course; targeted invites to coffee mornings; meet and greet with pupils and parent drop- ins. 

The vast majority of the families of those pupils in receipt of the Pupil Premium fully engage with the school (sometimes with support from the ELSA/SENDCo) and see the benefit of continued positive interaction. Parents feel confident enough to ask for help and also accept the help and advice when the school offers it. The school “open door” policy as well as the ease of access to the Senior Leadership Team, SENDCo and ELSA has had significant impact on parental engagement and involvement throughout the school.  School attendance was above average (prior to lockdown).

Booster/Intervention sessions to narrow gaps

In Year 6 (10 PP pupils), 4 PP pupils attended the early morning maths club designed to improve their basic skills and prepare them for transition to secondary school. Improvements were seen in mental calculation strategies particularly. All PP pupils in the year groups were part of the Booster Group and were also targeted by additional Teaching Assistant time. Internal progress measures in spring showed that PP pupils had made greater progress when compared to non-PP pupils.  In Year 2 (12 PP pupils) PP pupils were also making greater progress than non PP pupils, based on mid-year internal data.

 

Other interventions accessed by PP pupils in 2019-20202 included:

  • Bilingual support from an EAL specialist
  • Sensory circuits to support self-regulation
  • Precision Teaching to support spelling and phonics
  • Occupational Therapy programmes to develop gross and fine motor skills.

Additional TA Support for Behavioural Needs as a number of children entitled to PPG have very high levels of emotional need which results in challenging behaviour

The significant emotional needs (resulting in poor attendance, extreme behaviour and lack of academic achievement) of a small number of PP pupils have been addressed through the increased support they have received. Outside agency support has also been sought in these cases to ensure the needs of the pupils are being met in the best way possible.  This targeted support has resulted in a reduction in exclusions and a dual placement for one pupil.

Enrichment Activities, school milk and uniform.

The school continues to subsidise curriculum trips and provides an annual allowance for school uniform.  In 2019-2020 37.5% of PP pupils were supported with school trips and 43% of PP pupils received the uniform grant.

Covid Response

The school made provision for PP pupils to access learning during the lockdown period; however, the number that actively engaged in this was not high.  Pupils have returned to school with gaps which are being addressed through the recovery curriculum.  Additional training in phonics and reading have been given to all staff to support narrowing the gap.

How will the Grant be Spent in 2020 / 2021?

 

  • Talk About:  This intervention will be continued this academic year to support pupils with delayed language, listening skills, conversational skills, understanding their own and others body language as well as developing pupils’ assertiveness.  This will be run in small groups consisting of pupils in the same bubble.  This has meant a greater number of groups have been needed.

 

  • Meet and Greet:  This is part of the emotional literacy curriculum to support children in having a positive start to the day. The vast majority of those targeted are eligible for PPG. This has also helped increase attendance by reducing anxiety and tailoring the approach to meet individual needs.  Some pupils come in via the main front door, rather than through the main gate, whilst others have their own reward system.  The ELSA will also check that key individuals have had breakfast before coming to school and will provide this

 

  • Reconnecting Curriculum:  Revision of each class’ curriculum to ensure it meets the needs of the pupils, following lockdown.  This includes re-engaging pupils; building stamina and reconnecting with key skills.  Time is allocated for teachers and school leaders to review the teaching and learning, to ensure the gap is being narrowed.

 

  • Booster/Intervention sessions to narrow gaps: This will be delivered in a range of ways this year:
    • ​​​​​​Additional TA time in Year R and Year 1 to support early intervention, basic skills, language enrichment and phonics.
    • Deputy Head and Maths Leader breakfast club in Year 6, 1 day per week.
    • English Leader Breakfast Club targeting reading in Year 6, 1 day per week.
    • Two qualified teachers each morning to reduce the pupil:teacher ratio in Year 6 to help narrow the gap and prepare pupils for SATs / Writing Assessment.
    • Additional teacher one afternoon a week to boost phonics in Year 1 and 2 to help narrow the gap.
    • Delivery of the Nuffield Early Language Intervention (NELI) in Early Years.
    • 1:1 Precision teaching to support phonics, reading and spelling.

 

  • ELSA support:  The school ELSA is available all day to support those pupils who require it in the moment, particularly with the return to school, following Covid.  She is able to support pupils on a 1:1 basis or in small groups (from the same bubble).  The programmes run are research based effective strategies that have been shown to raise self-esteem, increase resilience, support self-regulation and improve attitudes to learning. The Boxall Profiling tool is used to measure impact.

 

  • Additional TA Support:  A number of children entitled to PPG have very high levels of emotional need, which results in challenging behaviour. In order to successfully integrate them into class based learning, they require additional support, above that provided by the class teacher and not funded/totally funded by the SEND budget. We have additional highly trained TAs in the school who work to support individuals. We also use additional TA time to provide additional 1-1/small group support time for those children who need extra practice and reinforcement, particularly in phonics and reading. 

 

  • Lunchtime support:  Due to the Covid restrictions, lunchtime groups are not possible; therefore, additional support has been put into classes to support pupils who struggle at lunchtime with socialising and also with eating issues. This enables these individuals to have a positive start to the afternoon, with improved attitudes to learning and increased self-regulation.

 

  • Homework Support: Providing opportunities for pupils to complete their Home Learning in school with the support of the child’s teacher, TA or member of SLT.

​​​​​​​

  • Acquiring effective materials for pupils entitled to PP / PP+ funding:  Pupils are given opportunities to log onto Bug Club (reading) or Times Tables Rockstars (maths) during the school day to ensure equal access to these.  Paper copies of the Bug Club books available for pupils who are unable to access the website at home.  PP Library where children can borrow additional books for personal use.

​​​​​​​

  • Enrichment Activities: Children with a wider experience base are often more able to apply their learning in different contexts, have a wide vocabulary and are able to use their imagination. All these different skills have a significant impact on children’s progress and lifting the barriers identified above. As a result of this the school funds/subsidises a number of enrichment activities targeted at those eligible for PPG. These include:
    • Leasing of the mini bus for regular trips including music events
    • Instrumental Lessons
    • Subsidies/funding for class curriculum trips
    • After School sports clubs targeted at children eligible for PPG but not solely (see Sports Premium Funding Report)

 

  • Uniform Entitlement:  Pupils eligible for the PPG are given a uniform allowance of £30 per academic year to purchase school uniform. Enabling all pupils to wear the same uniform ensures they look smart, gives the school an identity and gives every child a sense of belonging.

 

  • School Milk:  All pupils in receipt of the PPG are able to have milk in school each day and will be offered a snack if they have not had breakfast to ensure they are able to concentrate on their learning.

​​​​​​​

  • Agency Support: Pupils who are eligible for the PPG will continue to be prioritised for external agency support, including support from: Educational Psychologists; Bi-lingual Assistants and SAOS (Southampton Advisory Outreach Service).

​​​​​​​

  • Parental Support:  Due to Covid restrictions, it is not possible to run parent groups in the way that this has been done previously; however, the Leadership Team and ELSA is available to support parents on a 1:1 basis.  Much of this is done via the telephone but where meetings are held in person, these are risk assessed.

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  • Home Learning Support:  In the event of a pupil or class having to self-isolate, we have an allocated teacher who liaises with families to ensure that pupils have access to home learning.  This may be provided electronically; however, if the pupils do not have access to the online learning, the work will be printed and delivered to the family to ensure every child is able to access it.
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